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I asked Sally Cassar what was good?

Lots of opportunities to play with equipment, Working in small groups, Learning about etac, Seeing the factory, Fantastic evening dining real treat, Gavin's sense of humour, Chance to ask questions, Seeing all Etac hoist options, Getting ideas from others including Etac guys, Lunch was great, Lovely place to visit, Good organisation, Plenty of info pre trip.

I asked Sally Cassar what could have been better?

Better hotel with a bar! Gavin's jokes are really bad! (Hey Sal! What do you call an alien with no eyes?)

I asked Anna Hamer what was good?

The variety...being in a different country; 
clean but simple hotel; the hospitality from
our hosts for the evening meal; Paul the
magician - very funny and a real ice breaker;the friendliness and high level of skill of the other delegates; the training and chance to
try the equipment


I asked Anna Hamer what could have
been better?
I would have liked more discussion amongst the delegates of situations they had come 
across and how they have solved problems /used equipment/techniques - there was a
phenomenal amount of skill there. Also I
wish I had known that I was flying out on a
later flight so I didn't need to spend so muchtime in the airport. ( This is not a gripe as I
thought the whole trip was great.)

I asked Deborah Payn what was good?
Fantastic evening from start to finish. 
The workshop's were very good and I 
learned a lot. Met some great people who I'dlove to see again both from a professional
point of view and a social one. Great experience Well done Gavin.


I asked Deborah Payn what could have
been better?


If I'm honest, the travel could have been
improved. arriving at 8 and not flying till 12 was a waste of time. The rooms were a bit
basic but OK for 1 night. Did not know the
hotel was 2 hours away may have been a bit
better prepared if this information had been given beforehand. Would have liked to have seen a little bit more of Norway....but I
guess time wise bit restricted. Just minor
things still a worthwhile trip.

I asked Kate Leszkowski what was good?

The trip to Norway and training was very
interesting. It was good to see that hoists
and the equipment is researched / designed and made in the factory.

I asked Kate Leszkowski what could have been better?

The accommodation was fine however 
future trips may benefit from
networking opportunities i.e over breakfast. An area in the accommodation
where you could sit and discuss etc.


Moving & Handling Instructors

MHI - Norway Trip

Remember this? Well, we went and conquered the Vikings.

Day 1

We all met up at Stansted airport on the morning of Tuesday 3rd October. Everyone had been checked-in a couple of days earlier and so all that was left was for me to give everyone their boarding cards, which was done in the confines of my make shift office in Costa Coffee.

 

An uneventful flight was followed by a delay due to a mix up with the rental car. Eventually though, we got under way. Myself driving one 8-seater car with Jason Hinde of R82 driving the other. A beautiful drive travelling 100km north of Oslo along Norways largest lake, Mjosa, being 73 miles in length.

I won't tell you who fell out of bed, or who locked themselves out of their room, but we know who it was.I won't tell you who fell out of bed, or who locked themselves out of their room, but we know who it was.We arrived at the Gjorvik Kloverhotellet, a very basic but comfortable hotel. When I say basic, I mean, basic. There was a bed in each room, a shower and a toilet. There was also a TV that didn't work (not that we would have gotten very much from Norwegian TV if it was working). Breakfast was provided the night before in paper bags. Although we were also given cereal in the morning.

In the picture you can see, Rosemarie Scrutton, Jennifer Narnor, Paul (Sylvester) Seamans, Deborah Payn, Anna Hamer (I didn't realise at the time but Hamer was the town over the other side of the lake from us), Juliet Hanson, Myself, Linda Head, Sally Cassar, Carole Stewart, Pat Alexander, Linda Allan, Steve Burton, Kate Leszkowski and Paul Horsburgh. 

There was no receptioniBasic; but dry and comfortableBasic; but dry and comfortablest on during the night which proved to be a problem as one of the party wiped the information from the key card to their room by keeping it next to their mobile phone. They were able to share a room with another member of the group as most rooms were twins. The beds were long enough but seem to be narrower than a typical UK single bed. One member of the group found this out to her detriment when she rolled over and fell out of bed.

Brusveen GardBrusveen GardWe were picked up from the hotel by Christer Johansen from ETAC and taken to a wonderful old house with a lot of history that was central to the town of Gjorvik. The house, named Brusveen Gard, is the place where the King of Norway stays when he visits Gjovik. We were given the grand tour and even shown where the King sleeps when he stays there.

Brusveen Gard was also the place where we had the most wonderful meal. There was no menu in the restaurant, we were just fed, and fed well. Salmon to start, Reindeer for main course and something with cognac Paul Sylvester doing his tricks between coursesPaul Sylvester doing his tricks between coursesladen cream to finish with. Don't worry, I checked, the only red nose around was mine, we didn't eat Rudolf so your Christmas should still be able to go ahead. Each course came with a quality wine. Between courses, Paul Sylvester (available for weddings, funerals, engagements, bar mitzvahs and any other excuse for a party) entertained us with his mind boggling tricks. He cannot keep hold of a pen. He goes through more pens than WH Smith can supply him with.

The next day, we drove the couple of miles to the Molift ETAC plant. I, like most of you, have visited a number of factories before and they are usually noisy unfriendly places. Not ETAC though. It is such a pleasant atmosphere as the staff members busy themselves, assembling various pieces of equipment. With 7 of the 35 employed there engaged in research and development, ETAC don't intend to stand still. They are constantly at the cutting edge of safe patient handling.

Day 2Ole Thy doing his thingOle Thy doing his thing

The day started with an introduction from Christer regarding the history and mission of ETAC. I certainly did not realise the number of acquisitions that has been made over the last few years. I was obviously familiar with ETAC, R82, Immedia and Molift. However, the group also includes Star for pressure care and convaid for paediatrics. We toured the facility observing the cleanliness and friendliness as well as the attention to detail that the employees put into their work. Ole Lindahl Thy gave us some good information regarding ETAC education and then it was my turn where we considered how we have arrived at the need for reduced carer packages and information which would be useful for putting a business plan together.

 

Jason Hinde doing his thingJason Hinde doing his thingThere were four workstations set up so that we could explore various aspects of the Molift and Immedia equipment that we had at our disposal. This meant that we could split into smaller groups of just three or four people. Jason Hinde from R82 focussed on the satin sheets and uses for the one man sling, which not only included the usual use of assisting someone up the bed, but also a lesser known use of using it as a leg raiser into bed, either by a carer or the client doing it themselves.

 

Ole Thy showed the 4 way glide system and the popular twin Ole Thy doing his thingOle Thy doing his thingsheet systems. Using these with a hoist to turn someone, even a bariatric person with just one carer. Most of the people in the groups had seen this before, but with the groups being so small, there was a chance for each person to learn all of the little tricks, tugs and pulls which makes the job so much easier.

 

Paul Horsburgh of Abertay International Training, under the direction (off camera) of Christer JohansenPaul Horsburgh of Abertay International Training, under the direction (off camera) of Christer JohansenChrister Johansen showed the group around the marvels of the Molift Quick Raiser and other standing devices while my workstation considered an alternative method of raising someone from the floor with a hoist.

All sessions including the standy-up speaky bits were very interactive and the knowledge, experience and wisdom of the group shone forth.

Back to the airport and a long trip home for some of us. 

If you would like to attend this event next time we run it, please let me know. I have taken note of the comments regarding the hotel, and we will probably be staying in a better place next time but this will be reflected in the price. The price will be £250 if you don't mind sharing a twin room or £270 if you want a single room.

 Left to right: Steve Burton, Rosemarie Scrutton, Juliet Hanson, Linda Allan, Paul Hosburgh, Linda Head, Anna Hamer, Ole Thy, Gavin Wright, Jason Hinde, Jennifer Narnor, Paul (Sylvester) Semans, Pat Alexander, Sally Cassar, Kate Leszkowski, Carole Stewart, Deborah Payn & Christer Johansen. I'm not going to tell you who fell out of bed or who locked themselves out of their room, but you are looking at them now.Left to right: Steve Burton, Rosemarie Scrutton, Juliet Hanson, Linda Allan, Paul Hosburgh, Linda Head, Anna Hamer, Ole Thy, Gavin Wright, Jason Hinde, Jennifer Narnor, Paul (Sylvester) Semans, Pat Alexander, Sally Cassar, Kate Leszkowski, Carole Stewart, Deborah Payn & Christer Johansen. I'm not going to tell you who fell out of bed or who locked themselves out of their room, but you are looking at them now. 

Use the form below to express an interest (no commitment needed just yet) in coming on the next trip in about approximately 6-8 months time.

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